Pulled 2016

On the radio:

 

"On the Fringe" with Mary O'Neill, WLR FM 11/09/2016

http://www.wlrfm.com/shows/47-on-the-fringe-with-mary-oneill/4176-pulled-is-running-at-central-arts-in-waterford-city-until-sat-september-17th.html

"The Arts Show" with Ken McGuire, KCLR FM, 27/09/2016

http://kenmcguire.ie/pulled-new-work-niamh-moroney/

 

What the papers said:

Totes Amazeballs! By Cara O’Doherty for the Kilkenny Reporter 07-10-2016 A pair of besties hit The Set theatre in a three night run of Pulled, a play written by Niamh Moroney as part of Devious Theatre’s 10 year anniversary year. A  comedic commentary on today’s obsession with social media, the play centres on Amanda (Niamh Moroney) and Michelle (Andrea Bolger) as they attempt to piece together the events of a drunken night on the town. The audience were given a hint of what the show would entail as they were greeted outside the venue by the inebriated Amanda and coaxed into taking selfies. Once the audience were seated the interaction continued as Amanda danced her way up and down aisles. Dancing over, Amanda heads for the stage, set as her small flat bedecked with pizza box furniture. Much to Amanda’s horror bestie Michelle is passed out on her couch surrounded by evidence of a drunken party. It is hard to tell which is more upsetting for Amanda: that Michele broke in or that she missed a session. Barely sober, Michelle can’t quite remember how she got there. Using vodka to help balance the shakes backfires and she vomits it back up over a shocked audience member. As the puking settles The Fear kicks in. Michelle might have slept with someone, she probably did not use protection and she is most definitely in need of the morning after pill. Directed by Ita Morrissey, the production makes clever use of technology and space. As the girls turn to social media to chart the previous night’s events the clever devise of a big screen is used to project photos from Facebook and texts. The bedroom is turned into a pharmacy office by using a cut out shower curtain. It is simple but very effective. Throughout, Amanda speaks to her “followers”. Moroney switches between her online personality to pj-clad hangover victim with rapid fire precision whilst Bolger gives a warmth to Michelle that makes her quite lovable despite the puking.    For many Pulled was a trip down blackout lane. The Fear is something all too many of us have experienced and Moroney’s darkly comic look at it is both realistic and biting. No topic is off the cards for these Insta-Snap-book fanatics. At times shocking – the girls have a very liberal view of the morning after pill, it is also a reflective commentary on Ireland’s 8th amendment. A sharp commentary on contour-culture, Pulled is brave and funny – totes amazeballs in fact.

Totes Amazeballs! By Cara O’Doherty for the Kilkenny Reporter 07-10-2016

A pair of besties hit The Set theatre in a three night run of Pulled, a play written by Niamh Moroney as part of Devious Theatre’s 10 year anniversary year. A  comedic commentary on today’s obsession with social media, the play centres on Amanda (Niamh Moroney) and Michelle (Andrea Bolger) as they attempt to piece together the events of a drunken night on the town.

The audience were given a hint of what the show would entail as they were greeted outside the venue by the inebriated Amanda and coaxed into taking selfies. Once the audience were seated the interaction continued as Amanda danced her way up and down aisles. Dancing over, Amanda heads for the stage, set as her small flat bedecked with pizza box furniture. Much to Amanda’s horror bestie Michelle is passed out on her couch surrounded by evidence of a drunken party. It is hard to tell which is more upsetting for Amanda: that Michele broke in or that she missed a session.

Barely sober, Michelle can’t quite remember how she got there. Using vodka to help balance the shakes backfires and she vomits it back up over a shocked audience member. As the puking settles The Fear kicks in. Michelle might have slept with someone, she probably did not use protection and she is most definitely in need of the morning after pill.

Directed by Ita Morrissey, the production makes clever use of technology and space. As the girls turn to social media to chart the previous night’s events the clever devise of a big screen is used to project photos from Facebook and texts. The bedroom is turned into a pharmacy office by using a cut out shower curtain. It is simple but very effective.

Throughout, Amanda speaks to her “followers”. Moroney switches between her online personality to pj-clad hangover victim with rapid fire precision whilst Bolger gives a warmth to Michelle that makes her quite lovable despite the puking.   

For many Pulled was a trip down blackout lane. The Fear is something all too many of us have experienced and Moroney’s darkly comic look at it is both realistic and biting. No topic is off the cards for these Insta-Snap-book fanatics. At times shocking – the girls have a very liberal view of the morning after pill, it is also a reflective commentary on Ireland’s 8th amendment.

A sharp commentary on contour-culture, Pulled is brave and funny – totes amazeballs in fact.

PULLED play review by Liam Murphy of the Munster Express

Written by Niamh Moroney and starring Moroney and Andrea Bolger, Pulled is a seventy-minute 'play for today', at Central Arts up Andy Jordan's Lane. A co-production between Central Arts and Kilkenny's Devious Theatre Company this play is for the Snapchat and Instagram generation, that craves action, excitement, revved up, in-yer-face, response and yet couldn't give a squadron of 'flying fucks'.

We meet a spaced, unsteady Amanda (Moroney) on the staircase to the auditorium, and she takes selfies and considers the audience her 'followers' as in Facebook friends - virtual, essential, disposable. Her gaff is a tip where stacked up pizza cartons are used as furniture. She has been broken into, and her 'bestest best friend' Michelle (Andrea Bolger) is crashed out on the manky sofa, 'wasted' and unsure if she has had unprotected sex. But 'a ride is a ride', and there is always the Morning After pill.

This play will appal some, infuriate others but the characterisations are shamefully real and these excellent performers create the frighteningly real sub-culture where people wonder if you grind up paracetamol can you snort it. Their hard-edged vulnerability allows them to Snapchat, ask their followers 'Can you get pregnant on your period', and some followers answered too.

Direction by Ita Morrissey has a didactic tone about contemporary culture and questions of female identity. Heather Troy Whelan designed the confusing lighting with spot-on sound and projections.

I preferred it best when this duo were rude, crude and craving the instant 'bang' of attention, the 'snap' of the moment. So desperately eager for affirmation, attention, and applause, and they got it in all its noisy, messy ovation.

Earlier in the day, I saw the movie A Date For Mad Mary starring Seana Kerslake, whom I had seen over a year ago in Central Arts in a new play Hooked! Who knew what we know now and perhaps Niamh Moroney and  Andrea Bolger are poised on their seven-inch stilettos, with frightening attitude for greater and less nebulous fame.

 

Pulled… a must for any girl who… by John Cleere for the Kilkenny People 20/09/2016

This has been an exciting and ambitious year for Devious Theatre Company. Their third and last show of 2016, ‘Pulled’, has just finished a run at Central Arts in Waterford before it opens at the Set Theatre for three nights from Thursday, September 29.

The play, directed by Ita Morrissey, introduces us to the chaotic lives of Amanda (Niamh Moroney) and Michelle (Andrea Bolger). It’s the morning after the night before, with both girls somewhat unsure of what has gone on during the previous night out.

They’ve been on the town, they may or may not have had sexual encounters and one of them may or may not need the ‘morning after’ pill. They try to piece together the previous night’s goings on through their Snapchat, Whatsapp, and texts. It’s not a pretty picture that emerges.

The play is written by Niamh Moroney. She introduced us to her Amanda character in the hilarious ‘Yer Wan’ last year. This time the story is grimmer as we observe two characters whose lives seem to be spiralling out of control. They repeatedly declare their love and friendship for each other, but it is as meaningless as the succession of hashtags that they invent to cover every situation.

Niamh Moroney has again given us an insight into the lives of the millennial generation. It might prove to be uncomfortable viewing for some, but she has devised a piece that is well worth seeing and lightens the sombre elements with plenty of laugh out loud moments.

YER WAN 2014/15

Review: Yer Wan at Cleere’s By SoKilkenny.com  09/26/2014

I’m part of the full house in Cleere’s watching Niamh Moroney’s riveting performance in Yer Wan and I’m thinking of Val Doonican, or rather a song I remember him singing in his Aran sweater many moons ago. The song was called The Special Years.

The “special years” are over in this show, but Yer Wan hasn’t quite passed from “little girl to wife.” She has left home and set up in her house/flat somewhere in Ireland. We are a group of unwelcome guests in the house, watching her prepare for the big Friday night out.

Her pre-night out routine involves vodka, showering, dancing, vodka, makeup, tanning (with the help of a willing male from the audience), choosing the night’s outfit, texts, phonecalls and more vodka: all in pursuit of the Friday night “ride”, which hasn’t happened for three weeks.

Yer Wan isn’t interested in any long term relationship. A big picture of Ryan Gosling adorns the wall and this seems to be her vision of the ideal male. Her chances of meeting a Gosling on a Friday night in the local pubs and clubs seem slim, but this doesn’t stop her trying. If her Prince Gosling doesn’t show up this week, so what, there’s always next Friday.

For an hour we are part of the world of Yer Wan. We learn a lot about her, some of it we might prefer not to know. It’s a brilliant performance, worthy of its award at the Galway Fringe Festival. We want to know more about Yer Wan. What does she do for the rest of the week? The character, devised, written and performed by Niamh Moroney has a lot more to tell. She’s the modern woman, ready, as Val Doonican crooned in another song, to “Walk tall, walk straight and look the world right in the eye.”

We want more from Yer Wan.